Foreword.png
       
     
 Nisu, 26, comes from Hong Kong but lives in Denmark with her Danish husband from four years now. Doctors told Nisu she had a zero percent chance to have a child after being diagnosed with cancer in Denmark. Now, she is raising her 10 months old son, Mathias. “My son is truly a miracle. He’s against all the odds”.
       
     
 Nisu and Lars play with their son Mathias in the living room. In September 2014, Nisu was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. It is the eighth most common cancer for women globally and it ranks 18th in the most common cancers over all. In 2018 there were nearly 300,000 new cases according to the World Cancer Research Fund.
       
     
 Nisu and Lars met each other on Facebook ten years ago. "After my High School graduation in 2011, I decided to come to Denmark to visit Lars. By then a romantic relationship started”.
       
     
 At the beginning it was just a cyst. Very soon she started having pain and she went to a hospital to have more detailed checks. Then, a doctor called her and said she had a very big tumour and she must come to the hospital the day after to be operated. The doctors would have removed both her ovaries, but Nisu and Lars asked to remove just the right one which had the tumour since they wished to have a baby one day. This meant there was a risk the cancer could return.
       
     
 The operation was successful. Nisu returned home clear of cancer in her body. Nisu and Lars planned to go to Hong Kong for Lunar New Year but before they departed, the cancer had returned. “I was so devastated. We thought it was over. Because of that, I had to cancelled the flights and stay for chemotherapy. I started chemotherapy in February 2015 and then the real hell started”.
       
     
 Nisu makes up in her private room. To the right the red charm tells "good helth" in Chinese. During chemotherapy Nisu could only lie in bed, go to pee, vomit and go back to bed again. Nisu felt very sad after receiving the notice she would not have a child anymore. She searched online looking for any case of a woman that had cancer and chemotherapy who had been able to conceive. Finally, she found one. A woman from England who had two children after the chemotherapy. "I thought it’s not zero percent, it’s not absolute. I don’t want to give up".
       
     
 After applying for University two years later, something miraculous happened. Not only she was pregnant, but she was already in her fifth month. For her, most of the people who have cancer fight for their own life; for survival. “For me it was different. I fought cancer to have my baby!”. Learning from Nisu, fighting cancer is an act of love. Love for others, love for yourself, love for life. She demonstrates the courage love requires, and the importance to find a reason, and never let it go.
       
     
Foreword.png
       
     
 Nisu, 26, comes from Hong Kong but lives in Denmark with her Danish husband from four years now. Doctors told Nisu she had a zero percent chance to have a child after being diagnosed with cancer in Denmark. Now, she is raising her 10 months old son, Mathias. “My son is truly a miracle. He’s against all the odds”.
       
     

Nisu, 26, comes from Hong Kong but lives in Denmark with her Danish husband from four years now. Doctors told Nisu she had a zero percent chance to have a child after being diagnosed with cancer in Denmark. Now, she is raising her 10 months old son, Mathias. “My son is truly a miracle. He’s against all the odds”.

 Nisu and Lars play with their son Mathias in the living room. In September 2014, Nisu was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. It is the eighth most common cancer for women globally and it ranks 18th in the most common cancers over all. In 2018 there were nearly 300,000 new cases according to the World Cancer Research Fund.
       
     

Nisu and Lars play with their son Mathias in the living room. In September 2014, Nisu was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. It is the eighth most common cancer for women globally and it ranks 18th in the most common cancers over all. In 2018 there were nearly 300,000 new cases according to the World Cancer Research Fund.

 Nisu and Lars met each other on Facebook ten years ago. "After my High School graduation in 2011, I decided to come to Denmark to visit Lars. By then a romantic relationship started”.
       
     

Nisu and Lars met each other on Facebook ten years ago. "After my High School graduation in 2011, I decided to come to Denmark to visit Lars. By then a romantic relationship started”.

 At the beginning it was just a cyst. Very soon she started having pain and she went to a hospital to have more detailed checks. Then, a doctor called her and said she had a very big tumour and she must come to the hospital the day after to be operated. The doctors would have removed both her ovaries, but Nisu and Lars asked to remove just the right one which had the tumour since they wished to have a baby one day. This meant there was a risk the cancer could return.
       
     

At the beginning it was just a cyst. Very soon she started having pain and she went to a hospital to have more detailed checks. Then, a doctor called her and said she had a very big tumour and she must come to the hospital the day after to be operated. The doctors would have removed both her ovaries, but Nisu and Lars asked to remove just the right one which had the tumour since they wished to have a baby one day. This meant there was a risk the cancer could return.

 The operation was successful. Nisu returned home clear of cancer in her body. Nisu and Lars planned to go to Hong Kong for Lunar New Year but before they departed, the cancer had returned. “I was so devastated. We thought it was over. Because of that, I had to cancelled the flights and stay for chemotherapy. I started chemotherapy in February 2015 and then the real hell started”.
       
     

The operation was successful. Nisu returned home clear of cancer in her body. Nisu and Lars planned to go to Hong Kong for Lunar New Year but before they departed, the cancer had returned. “I was so devastated. We thought it was over. Because of that, I had to cancelled the flights and stay for chemotherapy. I started chemotherapy in February 2015 and then the real hell started”.

 Nisu makes up in her private room. To the right the red charm tells "good helth" in Chinese. During chemotherapy Nisu could only lie in bed, go to pee, vomit and go back to bed again. Nisu felt very sad after receiving the notice she would not have a child anymore. She searched online looking for any case of a woman that had cancer and chemotherapy who had been able to conceive. Finally, she found one. A woman from England who had two children after the chemotherapy. "I thought it’s not zero percent, it’s not absolute. I don’t want to give up".
       
     

Nisu makes up in her private room. To the right the red charm tells "good helth" in Chinese. During chemotherapy Nisu could only lie in bed, go to pee, vomit and go back to bed again. Nisu felt very sad after receiving the notice she would not have a child anymore. She searched online looking for any case of a woman that had cancer and chemotherapy who had been able to conceive. Finally, she found one. A woman from England who had two children after the chemotherapy. "I thought it’s not zero percent, it’s not absolute. I don’t want to give up".

 After applying for University two years later, something miraculous happened. Not only she was pregnant, but she was already in her fifth month. For her, most of the people who have cancer fight for their own life; for survival. “For me it was different. I fought cancer to have my baby!”. Learning from Nisu, fighting cancer is an act of love. Love for others, love for yourself, love for life. She demonstrates the courage love requires, and the importance to find a reason, and never let it go.
       
     

After applying for University two years later, something miraculous happened. Not only she was pregnant, but she was already in her fifth month. For her, most of the people who have cancer fight for their own life; for survival. “For me it was different. I fought cancer to have my baby!”. Learning from Nisu, fighting cancer is an act of love. Love for others, love for yourself, love for life. She demonstrates the courage love requires, and the importance to find a reason, and never let it go.